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lethe

PD diagnosis by blood test?

10 posts in this topic

  https://ca.news.yahoo.com/parkinsons-disease-diagnosis-could-aided-212206237.html

 

Parkinson's disease diagnosis could be aided with blood test

 

cbclogo-sm-sharp-175812-jpg_045904.jpg
CBC  

February 8, 2017

 

Swedish researchers say a simple blood test is effective at differentiating symptoms of Parkinson's disease from similar disorders, but it isn't ready for clinical use.

 

In its early stages, neurologists say Parkinson's is difficult to distinguish from rarer disorders, called atypical parkinsonian disorders. They have overlapping symptoms that tend to worsen more quickly and are more likely to lead to death.

 

Researchers are on the hunt for biomarkers to help diagnosis these disorders. One potential biomarker, a nerve protein that can be detected when nerve cells die, is  found in higher concentrations in spinal fluid collected by lumbar puncture. Now medical scientists have also found the protein in less invasive blood tests.

 

- Blood test for Parkinson's, Alzheimer's may soon be available in U.S.
 

For the study published in Wednesday's online issue of the journal Neurology, Dr. Oskar Hansson of Sweden's Lund University and his team examined 504 people in three groups.

Two of the groups, in England and Sweden, included healthy people and those who had been living with one of the disorders for an average of four to six years. The third group of 109 patients had the diseases for three years or less.

 

 

"The results of the present study strongly indicate that NfL when measured in blood can be used to distinguish between patients with Parkinson's disease and patients with progressive supranuclear palsy multiple system atrophy and corticobasal degeneration with high diagnostic accuracy," the study's authors said.

 

Hansson said concentrations of the nerve protein could discriminate between the diseases as accurately as its concentrations in spinal fluid.

 

Blood biomarkers have previously been considered in diagnosing Alzheimer disease but other teams weren't able to reproduce those findings.

 

That's why the Hansson's team turned to people at clinics in different countries in their evaluation.

 

Not there yet

 

The results also seem highly reliable, Dr. Guido Alves of the neurology department at Stavanger University Hospital in Norway  and his co-author said in a journal editorial.

 

While NfL levels help distinguish Parkinson's from the other disorders, it can't separate the other three, which would help clinicians, Alves said.

 

Most patients with Parkinson's showed NfL levels in the normal range. "We still lack an easily accessible disease-specific diagnostic biomarker for the most common movement disorder," according to the editorial.

 

The test was a research tool. To use it clinically, several more steps are needed. For instance, scientists need to determine cutoff values to flag abnormal levels.

 

But the value of early diagnosis is less clear when few disease-modifying treatments exist. 

 

The study was supported by the European Research Council, the Swedish Research Council, The Parkinson Foundation of Sweden, the Swedish Brain Foundation, the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, the Torsten Soderberg Foundation at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and the Swedish Federal Government under the ALF Agreement.

 

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Hi lethe,

good piece of breakthrough,hope the process would be sped up and put to use.Also all other studies should,be accelerated to find a cure.

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The headline for this study is misleading:  "Most patients with Parkinson's showed NfL levels in the normal range"  so this blood test doesn't appear to  diagnosis Parkinson's Disease but rather it helps doctors determine if PD is idiopathic or atypical.  Am I understanding this correctly?  Gardener

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Hi lethe,

good piece of breakthrough,hope the process would be sped up and put to use.Also all other studies should,be accelerated to find a cure.

I totally agree.  Too much time, energy, and $ is spent on how you get it and not how to stop it.  I feel that the experts give up on those who already have it and just concentrate on preventing it from happening.  When my mom use to see her neurologist she did nothing for her other than give refills every 2 months and jot some notes down.  I often think it was just her tracking my mom's disease progression and was preparing when she thought it was time for us to send her to the home.   I have no patience for people who do not try to find a solution but rather give a quick fix.  If something or someone is broken then get rid of it or them.   I don't follow that rule.

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I totally agree. Too much time, energy, and $ is spent on how you get it and not how to stop it. I feel that the experts give up on those who already have it and just concentrate on preventing it from happening.

If you don't know why something happens it's a lot harder to cure it. That can happen, but it's usually blind luck.

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Yes and no.   Equal time spent on finding the how and what to do about it after the fact  should be key.

 

Which, I think, really, is what they're doing.  There are a few folks on here doing the Isradapine and Inosine drug trials.  Plus, as mentioned, I've been a part of a couple studies looking more at the why.  

 

The thing of it, IMHO, is that we need to look at a lot of the research as something that will mostly benefit those that wind up with PD 30-50 years down the road.  And also recognize that it was mostly those 30-50 years ago who's participation in trials is finally benefiting us now.

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Sorry to be so  negative here but how have we benefited from 30 years ago? Whatever we have available now is not without side effects for a lot of people and we seem to have stalled for a long time since.   Looking into the how means they are concentrating on prevention which is further delaying research for those that already have it.  I'm sure those of you who are suffering from this horrible disease does not want to be disregarded and given up on.

Edited by miracleseeker
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Gardener got it right!!

 

Since NFl levels are within the normal range in patients with Parkinson's, this blood test is NOT useful for the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease per se (i.e. differentiation of PD patients from normal subjects) . However, it may be of use in the differential diagnosis of PD  from atypical parkinsonism (PD-plus syndromes: MSA, PSP, CBD).

Edited by christie

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Correct me if I am wrong, doesn't most cures come from understanding how and why a disease happens?

 

I feel you pain Miracleseeker. I believe that a cure in my lifetime most likely won't happen and if it does it will be to late to do me any good. The damage has been done. Need a cure and a restorative procedure.

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