Jump to content
helplinedonate
  • Announcements

    • ForumAdmin

      Frequently Asked Questions - Step by step guides

      Do you need assistance registering, logging in, posting, etc? Please visit the all new Frequently Asked Question Forum for step-by-step guides. Click the link below to access these helpful guides. Frequently Asked Questions
    • ForumAdmin

      Recursos Nuevos en Español

      http://www.parkinson.org/ayuda   http://www.parkinson.org/espanol    
    • ForumAdmin

      Línea de Ayuda 1-800-473-4636

      Línea de Ayuda 1-800-473-4636   ¿Qué es la línea de ayuda 1-800-4PD-INFO (473-4636) de la Fundación Nacional de Parkinson? Es un número de teléfono gratuito que ayuda a las personas con la enfermedad de Parkinson, sus familiares, amigos y profesionales de salud, a solucionar diferentes inquietudes.   La línea de ayuda ofrece: Información actualizada Apoyo emocional Referidos a profesionales de salud Recursos comunitarios Amplia variedad de publicaciones gratis    
stump

Summer adventure season starting

Recommended Posts

Wow! A gold star for you, Stump. What an undertaking. I feel so happy that you are able to enjoy your life the way you have in the past.

Dianne

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yesterday (9/16) was the Bellingham Traverse race.  It's a relay (well, you can do the whole thing solo, and quite a few people did so, but most do it as a 2 or 5 person team) with a total of 6 legs.  There's a road run, mountain bike, road bike, trail run, paddle, and finally a team run that make up the total event.  My part was the paddle leg, plus of course the team run.  The total course for the paddle leg was 3.6 miles, and the only restriction was it had to be human powered (so no sails or motors, but any style of paddle or pedal drive was OK).  I used a borrowed sea kayak as it should have been quite a bit faster than my own kayak given that it's longer and narrower.  

 

My time for that leg was 43 minutes.  I passed at least half a dozen other paddlers, and only got passed by 1 during that paddle.  By the end I couldn't feel my feet, my knees took a while (a minute or two) to work correctly again, and my right hand (not the PD affected side, but very much my dominant side) was about seized up.  Part of the problem was my water bottle slid to my feet when I was getting into the kayak and I wasn't able to get to it until 3/4 of the way to the end.  So I was really thirsty by then.  But also the cockpit of the kayak was so tight that I couldn't shift around at all since my feet were jammed up against each other and my knees were essentially pinned in place.

 

But, overall it was a good race.  I'm pleased with my time.   I think with some focused training I could get under 40 minutes next year even with the same kayak and paddle.  With a faster kayak (a surf ski especially) and a more race oriented paddle I could definitely cut more time, probably another 5 minutes or so, and probably have fewer problems with my feet and knees at the end.  A different paddle might also help some with the hand issues.  Fitting my Camelbak hydration bladder to my PFD or something would also help a lot.

 

I'll almost certainly do this again next year, assuming work doesn't interfere.

Edited by stump
typos
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LAD said:

Nice! 

 

It's t-minus 1 for our family trip to London.  Stay tuned!

 

LAD

Excellent!  Never been to Europe.  Been to New Zealand 3 times, but not the UK.  Have a great trip!

Edited by stump

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We had buckingham palace on our list of must see in London but there's no guards in puffy red hats?!

 

37457034415_fd80d4e2b3_b.jpg

LAD

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's my thread so I can drift it if I want to!!!

 

LAD's post about her trip to the UK is a decent segue anyway.  My boss came to me a week or so ago and mentioned that his proposal as part of the 2018 department budget for funding to send me to India got past the first real round of checks with senior management.  I've been the lead for all of the projects we off-shore so I've been working with the crew in India for 4 years now.  High time I got to go there and actually meet those people face to face.

 

So, if all goes well, sometime in the next 15 months I'll get to make a trip to India.  Could be as early as February, or might not be until Nov/Dec next year.  Main thing though is to avoid travel there from June-August, and May and September are not great either due to the monsoons.  From what I've been told October-March is the best time frame.  

 

Not sure how long I'll be able to be there, but probably at least a week on business.  Plan is to then have DW join me and take a week of vacation time and go exploring.  I really want to visit at least one of the tea growing regions of India since I do drink quite a lot of tea.  While I'd love to go to Darjeeling that might (or might not) be a bad idea.  Apparently there is a Maoist (i.e. communist) terrorist group that is active in the Assam province and at least US government officials require special permission from the government to go there because of the risks.  As a tourist the risks would be a lot lower, but still.  However there is a region in the southern tip that also grows a lot of tea that is also supposed to be especially beautiful and interesting besides the tea.  So we might go there instead.  Also New Delhi is a pretty likely destination, and would make it possible to see places like the Taj Mahal.  

 

Besides all the cool things to see and do one goal will be see if I can manage to get tired of curries.  If all I have is 2 weeks my biggest issue will probably be too many options for different curries and not being able to try them all.  I'm pretty much a carnivore, but given some properly made Indian food I've had I don't even think I'll mind a couple weeks of vegan eating there (and likely I'll be able to get plenty of meat if I want - lots of Hindu's aren't vegetarian let alone vegan, and some even eat beef - point being I expect it to be so delicious I won't care if it has meat in it or not).

 

Just have to hope I can avoid the "Delhi Belly" (aka Montezuma's Revenge, aka dysentery) in the process of trying all that food.  I do at least know enough to only drink bottled water, or drinks like tea that involve boiling the water, or beer that has enough alcohol to kill any pathogens.  Also avoiding things like salads that have been washed in local tap water.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, my last post, I thought was lost and wasn't going to re-type it all.  Then, somehow my laptop remembered it.  :ph34r:

 

Anyway, a bit of an interruption to my adventure schedule.  2 years ago I had surgery for an inguinal hernia.  It would appear that hernia is recurring.  :angry:  Should have a consult scheduled with a surgeon soon.  Going to try to push to have any surgery after elk hunting season (first week of November).  It's not nearly as painful or restrictive, yet anyway, as last time so I'm pretty sure, for now, that I can afford to push off any surgery.  Definitely not going back to the last surgeon though.  After the multiple screw ups with my prescription documents that left me literally screaming in agony I'm done with them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stump, I'm sure a new hernia was the last thing you were hoping for. Please make sure you don't get out in the Cascades and have to haul a half-ton elk out to civilization with a ruptured hernia.

I have no idea how much elk weigh. Just a wild guess.

Dianne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3/8 of a ton live weight for a large mature bull elk.  But, that's why they get cut into several pieces, and why I'll be with 2 other guys.  And, thankfully, farthest we've had to pack one back to the boats was about 200 yards.

 

Anyway, consult is scheduled with a surgeon at Providence in Everett for Tuesday afternoon.  We shall see what he has to say.

 

But, yes, this was well down on my list of things I was hoping for.  There are worse things, so I'll just try to be greatful it's not one of them.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Stump-you seem like a not going to stop me kind of guy so I am confident we will be reading about your next adventure sooner rather than later! 

Good luck!!

 

LAD

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, LAD said:

 

Stump-you seem like a not going to stop me kind of guy so I am confident we will be reading about your next adventure sooner rather than later! 

Good luck!!

 

LAD

I am going to write off deer season this year.  Just don't want to risk aggravating the hernia and having that cost me elk season.  But otherwise, yes, I'm not letting this stop me from doing much.  Obviously I have to slow down a bit and be somewhat cautious until I get the surgery as otherwise I'll wind up in a lot of pain and be forced into not doing a lot of things.

 

I will continue to exercise, though I might back off a touch.  But between weight loss and improved blood pressure (102/60something yesterday at the family doctor instead of 130's/80's) and I don't want to lose that progress.

 

One good thing to note is the surgeon I'll be seeing sounds like about the best I could have hoped for.  My family doc asked one of her nurses that used to work at that hospital's ICU for a recommendation.  In my experience if a nurse, and especially an ICU nurse, recommends a surgeon that is a pretty rock solid reason to go with that doctor.  Nurses typically have a low opinion of most doctors, especially surgeons.  I also asked another friend that due to his work would be very much in the know about who the good surgeons in that area are.  And when I gave him that name he said he was "outstanding" and that he'd not hesitate to let that surgeon operate on himself or anyone in his family.  

 

After my consult I'll update with my first hand impressions of him.  Assuming all goes well, if anyone in the Puget Sound area wants his name you can PM me for that info.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, good news - wasn't actually a hernia, so no surgery.  Bad news, it's an injury to the inguinal ligament, which means a very long recovery.  It still hurts, but not quite as bad.

 

Anyway, I never did get out for deer this year.  Bummer.  But, elk season opens on Saturday, and my oldest and I are heading out tomorrow morning.  We'll meet up with a couple buddies and hopefully get my daughter her cow elk.  Weather looks suitably crappy on Saturday so we just might luck out with an opening day elk.

 

Probably won't post much for the next week.  There is internet, but I'll just have my phone, so minimal desire to post.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FALL adventure season starting...GO!  

Any beautiful fall walks? I've been to Pittsburgh a few times to go to the PITT football games and to visit my son...

who's next???

 

LAD

 

37438636824_10bd352695_b.jpg

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just got back from elk hunting.  Will post up the full story in a day or so, but bottom line was my daughter got her first elk!  

 

Diane - butcher said hanging weight (so all muscles and bones, but no innards, skin/fur, or head) was 260lbs.  That equates to around 425lbs while still walking around.

 

Edit to add: Last year, after we were all done, we were told that dead elk float.  Their hair is hollow (which I knew from my days of tying my own trout flies) and that gives them enough buoyancy to float.  I can now, by personal experience, verify that they do indeed float.  I'll be darned.  We used that, along with a small motor, to our advantage this year in getting the elk back to the truck.

Edited by stump
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Way to go, Stump's daughter! As for you, Stump, I'm happy you are taking good care of yourself. Dead elk float; who knew? What does elk meat taste like? If you tell me it tastes like chicken, I won't believe you.

Dianne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A little hard to explain what elk tastes like.  Have you ever eaten deer, mutton or goat?  Elk tastes sort of like a cross between beef and deer.  Milder than deer, but still super lean like deer (so kind of a beefy mild venison).  Mutton and goat, if a very lean cut, have a similar texture to elk, though the flavor is a bit different.  Unless it's a really tough cut that you need to, say, braise for hours to make it tender, elk is usually best cooked hot and fast to rare or medium-rare.  As you cook a nice steak or roast beyond medium-rare it starts to get tough and kind of livery tasting.  By the time a steak is well-done it's only edible to people that don't really like meat but eat it anyway if cooked to death.

 

What most people think of as a "gamey" flavor is actually the beginnings of spoilage.  The key to having maximum quality of the meat is to keep the animal clean and get it cooled down quickly.  Once the hide is removed you also have to keep the meat dry as water will induce bacterial growth and thus spoilage.  

 

In the case of this elk it was dead around 3:30PM on Tuesday.  By 5PM we had it at the boat launch.  By 8PM it had the innards removed the hide taken off.  By doing that at the launch we were able to partially hoist it up, and thereby keep it really clean.  By 9:30 we'd been able to get it to a chiller that got it down to 36F.

 

The cow elk I was able to get last year was a fiasco.  It died in a mud hole and it took us 5-6 hours to hack it apart and get it out of that hole.  Then we had to shelter for another 6 hours waiting for the tide to come up enough that we could safely get on the water (meanwhile the meat was getting rained on), then another almost 1.5 hours paddling back to the launch struggling to keep the meat from getting wet with dirty river water.  Then we had to sleep for a couple hours with the meat hanging in 50F weather because were incoherent by then.  Then we cleaned as much of the nasty dirt/hair/etc off as we could, and got it to that chiller.  The meat was still fabulous but we lost a lot of it (10% easily) due to the contamination.  Butcher gave us a A for effort, but a C-/D+ for execution on that one.  

 

This year's elk should be even better quality since we were able to keep it so much cleaner, dry, and got it chilled so much faster.  This time the butcher gave an A for both effort and execution.  And he's a grouch that isn't shy about telling you what you did wrong and how much it annoys him.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had debated for a while if my oldest was really ready to go elk hunting.  Those of you that have seen my reports from years past know what a high level of suckage can be involved in hunting elk by kayak/canoe.  But, we made a few changes this year and that combined with my daughters maturity and desire convinced me to go ahead and put her in for a youth cow tag.  Deal I made was she could join in only if she drew tag.  She had 3 points in the draw since I'd been putting her in for ghost points the previous couple of years.  Average to draw the tag was around 1.7 points, so I figured odds were good she'd get the tag.  And she did.

The changes we made this year included my buddy getting a motor for his canoe.  He got a British Seagull (aka the Dirty Birdie) that enabled us to get into areas to really quickly and with less physical effort, and then from there we'd just paddle as before.  Last year after we got Miss Swampy out we also found out that elk float (before being skinned), so the plan became to tow the elk out under power from the motor to hopefully get home sooner and with less suckage.  

Another change was we got a block and tackle.  Idea was to be able to hoist an elk out of a mud hole if that happened again, plus we could use it to hoist it up for gutting/skinning once back at the truck.  All of which was designed to make our lives a bit easier as well as result in a cleaner carcass that we could get into a chiller faster.  We got 150ft of static line so we could drag the elk too as long as we had a tree or some other anchor to pull from.

Friday we headed out to the area.  Since I had my daughter with me I drove separately rather than car pooling as before.  We just didn't really have space to be comfy if we all went together.  Plus, I knew my daughter would probably need to be run home before the other guys to get back for school stuff.  Got down to Mark Collett's place in the early afternoon as his wife was willing to loan my daughter some dry pants and dry top for immersion protection.  Then we headed to the campground and got everything ready for the morning.

Opening day we hit one of the rivers we had seen a crap load of elk on the previous year.  Unfortunately the weather was really too nice for good hunting.  Clear, calm, kind of warm, full moon.  Pretty much everything you want for a nice weekend at the coast, but the opposite of what makes for good elk hunting opportunities.  Saw a 2x2 blacktail buck, but nothing else that day.  Next day we hit the same river again, with similar results.  Day 3 we went to a different river.  Still no elk came out to play, but we did see a family of river otters.  They were rather perturbed that were wanting to go by their home.  Probably also suffering whisker envy after seeing my mustache.  

After that third day and really working it pretty hard all 3 days and seeing nothing I was starting to get pretty worried.  I had talked to the campground host and he had mentioned that he had some private land he hunted during archery season.  Figuring I had little to lose I asked if he could see if that land owner might be willing to let my daughter hunt his land.  Some are willing to do that for a kid.  But not all.  He was in the "not all" category.  Which is fine.  

So, Tuesday we went back to that first river after getting reports of some cow herds being spotted out there the previous day.  We went to the lunch tree (so called because we usually eat lunch there) and we all sat down and relaxed and glassed for a while.  

6qeVM.jpg

Eventually I decided to go to my kayak and pull it up a ways so it wouldn't start to float away with the tide still coming in.  Plus Steve had his binos in a dry bag in my kayak so I was going to grab them for him.  As I started to get up I looked out a ways and there were some brownish dots I didn't remember seeing before at the tree line somewhere around 800-1000 yards out.  Got my binos on the spot and sure enough, a small herd of 7 or 8 elk was out there!  We got back in the boats and started heading towards them.  I always knew it would be a tough approach as the tide had flooded the marsh so there was absolutely nothing to conceal our approach.  There was a mix of state lands, timber company land, and individual (i.e. not corporate) owned land and thankfully these elk were in a section of state land so we knew we were OK to go after them.

6qN31.jpg

We started to paddle towards them and once we were within about 500 yards went pretty slowly.  By the time we were within maybe 400-450 yards I could see they were all cows except for 1 spike.  With it being a 3-point minimum that meant this was all about getting my daughter a cow for her antlerless special permit tag.  We kept going about as slow as we reasonably could, but before we had closed the distance to anything better than 350 yards they started to head back into the forest.  I'm not sure if they saw us and decided to play it safe, or if the ducks that were flying off as we got close spooked them, or if they had just decided they'd eaten enough and were going to bed down for a bit while their rumens settled.  Whatever the case, we couldn't get it done on that round.

So, we backed out and paddled up the river to another area close to where I shot my cow last year.  After checking around that area for half an hour or so we cautiously started to head back down stream again.  I kept checking with my glass the area around where we'd seen that herd.  Eventually I spotted a small group of 3 elk maybe 50 yards from where that first group had been.  There was an obvious lead cow, a yearling, and another smaller probably 2 year old cow.  

We turned and started to head their way.  I had my daughter get her rifle out of the dry bag and get a round chambered (safety still on and good muzzle discipline of course).  As we started getting closer I saw that lead cow watching us.  Rather intently.  Fearing another blown approach, and still being much to far out for me to feel comfortable letting my daughter shoot (both accuracy and round horsepower) I signaled to the other guys to stop so we just drifted over some flooded grass and got stopped.  We watched those cows for probably 10 minutes until the lead cow appeared to relax and go back to feeding.  Then we started working closer again.  Eventually that cow keyed in on us again, but didn't seem overly worried.  So we kept very slowly working in closer and closer.  Eventually we got to within 120 yards so I had my buddy help my daughter get set up for the shot.  I positioned myself a little ways away so I could better observe where they might go after a shot.  It took a while for my daughter to get into a position where she was comfortable with taking the shot.  She tried prone with the forearm of the rifle on the gunwale but that had her too low to have a good line of sight.  She could not get steady enough from a sitting or kneeling position.  So my buddy had her take a paddle and stick the blade into the mud/grass that the canoe was grounded on and then use the thumb of the hand that was gripping the handle of the paddle as a rest for the forearm of the rifle (top of the handle was too high to be useful).  That got her steady and with a good line for the shot.  This whole time the cow just kept standing there looking right at me (but not my daughter who was 20 yards away to my left).  However the other 2 cows were out of sight, so that lead cow was the only option.

Finally the shot rings out.  The cow spins and starts to head towards safety, but slips in the water where there was a drop off.  That was it for her other than a little kicking.  Within 20 seconds even that kicking was over.  She fell maybe 2-3 steps from where she'd been standing at the shot.

6qlDq.jpg

Once we got to her I used my paddle to touch the eye to confirm death.  Then it was high 5's, a couple pictures, and getting a rope around her neck to tow her back to the truck.  Took a little bit of pushing and shoving but without too much effort she was fully in the water.  And floating.  That was a happy sight!

6qSWA.jpg 

The other 2 guys in the canoe were having a little bit of a hard time finding a path deep enough to get back to the main river channel as we were basically in an area that was only flooded because it was a +11ft high tide.  So I got in my kayak and found a path with deep enough water for the canoe and the elk.  They paddled through that path and once on the river they fired up the motor to start heading to the truck.  I paddled back to the lunch tree to gather a dry bag and a couple coats that had been left there when we left the tree to go after that first group of elk.  I eventually caught them back up just as we both made it to the truck.

6qnvQ.jpg 

Then came the work of pulling the elk from the water and getting her gutted and skinned.  Once done with the gutting I took the entrails well out into the water and cut them in a bunch of places to get them to sink and then we got to work on skinning.  We had a jerry rigged hoist that didn't give us enough lift, but we were at least able to get her butt off the ground and got a tarp under her.  Next year we'll have a better system for lifting an elk up higher.  After we got the elk stuck, and part way through the gutting I let my girl sit in the warm truck and relax and rest a bit.

We finally got the elk skinned out, got the gear and boats all loaded up, and headed back to camp.  Shot was fired about 3:30PM.  We were back at camp getting beer out of a cooler before 9PM.  We called up a game meat cooler that was about 10 miles away and fortunately they were still up so we boogied over there with the elk so it could hang in a proper temperature and away from rain.  Got back to camp and had some food, some beer, enjoyed the campfire, took showers, and eventually hit the sack.

When we got it to the butcher, who is a fairly grouchy guy that doesn't shy away from telling you what he really thinks, he was really pleased with how clean it was and how it looked.  I took the heart and liver and head home.  I got the cheeks off the head for a treat that I'll probably cook tomorrow.  The liver I trimmed up and that will be used to make some boudin sausage.  I trimmed and dissected the heart too.  That's when I found a few pieces of the bullet.  Kiddo got the heart with the shot!

 

 

Edited by stump
fix pictures
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I realize these posts on hunting are considered "Summertime Adventures" by some, but to others, it is considered "unnecessary killing of animals."  I know this is a "sport" to you Stump and to others on this forum and you are very proud of your accomplishments, however some of us do not share in this enthusiasm and to be honest, are down right offended.

The passion I have against this topic is as strong as the passion you have for it.  I am sure I speak for others as well.

As I am sure you are aware, "Hunting" is a very controversial subject.  

I have a respectful suggestion for you:  Could you make a separate tread with Topic:  Hunting?

That way those of us that are very adverse to the subject; especially pictures and descriptions on how the animal succumbed, would be able to avoid such a thread.

Because there are other adventures I was interested in reading on this thread, I was forced to view  innocent, unassuming dead animals.

Hope you can understand my request and find it reasonable.

btw - I am not interesting in opening a discussion on "Hunting," just merely requesting it be named on it's own thread.

 

 

Edited by ellaangel2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×