Jump to content
helplinedonate
Rainbow

Antidepressants and Rasagiline and Pramipexola

Recommended Posts

Hello Everyone,

My mom is a newly diagnosed PD patient and using Pramipexola (0.375 mg) and Zoloft(25 mg) Is there anybody who uses these drugs? What other drugs are you using besides or other than these drugs? Is there anybody on Rasagiline as a newly diagnosed patient. My mom was diagnosed in last July.

Also what type of exercises and how long do you do it?

Do you prefer cardio/high intensity exercises or low intensity, like walking 30 mins a day? Which one is more beneficial?

Sorry for a lot of questions, just trying to figure out what is best for my mom at this moment.

Looking forward to hearing your type of treatment plan!

Thank you for your time!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use rasagiline  Dr says they believe it may slow down the progression of Pd and supposed to aid the other drugs to prevent the wearing off effect as your dose wears off . I don't use any of the others though . 

Dan

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello, Rainbow --

Lots of questions are good!  No need to apologize.

I was taking Pramipexole and Amantadine before Rasagiline came on the market.  But as soon as it did, my doctor wanted me to add it to my regimen of drugs, which I did.  It is hard to say what each drug accomplishes for me, but I know that Pramipexole (Mirapex) is my chief symptom fighter.  It eliminated my handwriting problem, any tremors I had, my awkward gait, and more.  Whether Amantadine or Rasagiline or both may be responsible for delaying the disease's progress I do not know.  However, I have now had PD more than 20 years, and I am still in the first stage of development.  My doctors are not sure why, but we don't want to change anything in my treatment when I am lucky enough to be doing so well.

Exercise is important.  For many years of my PD, I exercised strenuously and often.  I am now 71 years old and have slacked off a lot without noticing any difference.  I read an article not long ago stating that exercise beyond 45 minutes does not do any more for the body.  My results make me believe it.  I used to work on weight machines and the elliptical more than I do now.  I have been practicing tai chi for five years and find it very helpful with flexibility and balance.  I also walk two to five miles per day five days a week over quite hilly trails and sidewalks.    If your mother is young and can do more, bicycling is reputedly excellent for many PD patients, too.  Or she could join a square dancing or line dancing class.

Your mother is fortunate to have you as her support and her researcher!  Good luck to both of you.

J

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you so much Hunter Dan and J of Grey Cottage. Your answers helped me a lot. I will keep you updated about my mom's doctor visit and how it turned out. It will be in months and she will ask her doctor if she can add Rasagiline to her medicines. She is 70 years old and she is walking 30 minutes every day. She lives in Turkey and I live in US. Researching for her makes me feel better maybe if I were living with her I would not research that much and spend fun time with her. Just trying to be useful for her. And friends like you help me a lot. Thank you so much for providing support!! And I am so glad that you are doing well.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/3/2017 at 7:14 PM, J of Grey Cottage said:

Hello, Rainbow --

Lots of questions are good!  No need to apologize.

I was taking Pramipexole and Amantadine before Rasagiline came on the market.  But as soon as it did, my doctor wanted me to add it to my regimen of drugs, which I did.  It is hard to say what each drug accomplishes for me, but I know that Pramipexole (Mirapex) is my chief symptom fighter.  It eliminated my handwriting problem, any tremors I had, my awkward gait, and more.  Whether Amantadine or Rasagiline or both may be responsible for delaying the disease's progress I do not know.  However, I have now had PD more than 20 years, and I am still in the first stage of development.  My doctors are not sure why, but we don't want to change anything in my treatment when I am lucky enough to be doing so well.

Exercise is important.  For many years of my PD, I exercised strenuously and often.  I am now 71 years old and have slacked off a lot without noticing any difference.  I read an article not long ago stating that exercise beyond 45 minutes does not do any more for the body.  My results make me believe it.  I used to work on weight machines and the elliptical more than I do now.  I have been practicing tai chi for five years and find it very helpful with flexibility and balance.  I also walk two to five miles per day five days a week over quite hilly trails and sidewalks.    If your mother is young and can do more, bicycling is reputedly excellent for many PD patients, too.  Or she could join a square dancing or line dancing class.

Your mother is fortunate to have you as her support and her researcher!  Good luck to both of you.

J

 

On 8/29/2017 at 4:31 PM, Hunter Dan said:

I use rasagiline  Dr says they believe it may slow down the progression of Pd and supposed to aid the other drugs to prevent the wearing off effect as your dose wears off . I don't use any of the others though . 

Dan

 

On 9/3/2017 at 7:14 PM, J of Grey Cottage said:

Hello, Rainbow --

Lots of questions are good!  No need to apologize.

I was taking Pramipexole and Amantadine before Rasagiline came on the market.  But as soon as it did, my doctor wanted me to add it to my regimen of drugs, which I did.  It is hard to say what each drug accomplishes for me, but I know that Pramipexole (Mirapex) is my chief symptom fighter.  It eliminated my handwriting problem, any tremors I had, my awkward gait, and more.  Whether Amantadine or Rasagiline or both may be responsible for delaying the disease's progress I do not know.  However, I have now had PD more than 20 years, and I am still in the first stage of development.  My doctors are not sure why, but we don't want to change anything in my treatment when I am lucky enough to be doing so well.

Exercise is important.  For many years of my PD, I exercised strenuously and often.  I am now 71 years old and have slacked off a lot without noticing any difference.  I read an article not long ago stating that exercise beyond 45 minutes does not do any more for the body.  My results make me believe it.  I used to work on weight machines and the elliptical more than I do now.  I have been practicing tai chi for five years and find it very helpful with flexibility and balance.  I also walk two to five miles per day five days a week over quite hilly trails and sidewalks.    If your mother is young and can do more, bicycling is reputedly excellent for many PD patients, too.  Or she could join a square dancing or line dancing class.

Your mother is fortunate to have you as her support and her researcher!  Good luck to both of you.

J

Hello J –

I'm new to PD and am on the first 30 day treatment with Azilect. So far the symptoms are not worse. I feel the worse symptom is my struggling to write and hope for the moment when I can again. Are you still taking the list of meds on your profile; Mirapex, Azilect, Carbidopa/Levodopa, Amantadine, Ubiquinol (CoQ10)? And are you taking Pramipexole?

Edited by BobbieH
Oh Mirapex is Pramipexole. Confusing drugs with multiple names. But my question is still, are you taking all of the meds noted? Thank you.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/29/2017 at 4:31 PM, Hunter Dan said:

I use rasagiline  Dr says they believe it may slow down the progression of Pd and supposed to aid the other drugs to prevent the wearing off effect as your dose wears off . I don't use any of the others though . 

Dan

Hello Dan –

After four months on just rasagiline, how are you doing now? Is this the brand version?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been taking it for awhile now and haven't noticed that the PD has progressed . With that being said I don't depend solely on medication . Since I was first diagnosed in 2015 I have not increased any of the dosages on any meds . I have continued to stay active with exercise and other physical activities such as ice hockey once a week and hiking when the weather cooperates . Because of the balance issues I don't work anymore because my job required me to work at higher elevations . So to answer the question I am doing fairly well , but I can't say the meds or the activity is the reason, or the combination . But I can say they haven't had any negative side effects that I am aware of .

Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dan thank you for replying. Your physical activities are encouraging to me.

How's your handwriting? For me this is the most bothersome symptom. I hope that one med (Azilect) will do the trick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All exercise is good... it's important to find one she likes so she stays with it. A PD exercise group is a bonus for the social part of it. I help with a group in my community and it is a PD specific program but it's also a pseudo supporter group. 

 

LAD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi bobbieH,

My handwriting hasn't really improved yet, but I've only been on Azilect for a few weeks. I've got pretty painful dystonia in my dominant right hand and a tremor. I've had limited success with taking Baclofen, a muscle relaxer.  But if it hasn't cleared up in about March, I'm going to demand that my MDS give me something stronger.

-S

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Super!

I'm giving "Az" more time. Problem is I have to find a less expensive pharmacist. My insurance increased it to 275. per month this year. Has anyone used NW Pharmacy out of Canada? It is about 100.+ less and not restricted to just 30 tablets at a time.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Bobbi

Another forum member (Adam, i think)  posted this elsewhere 

Before you need to refill your Azilect prescription next year try applying here. https://tafcares.org/  They covered all my $1100 out of pocket each time I refill. All I had to pay was a $10 copay. The coverage is good for one year then you can renew.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My handwriting isn't as good as it was in the past . But not terrible yet , as my major symptoms hammer the left side of my body and I am right handed where the symptoms are still minor .

Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/3/2017 at 7:14 PM, J of Grey Cottage said:

Hello, Rainbow --

Lots of questions are good!  No need to apologize.

I was taking Pramipexole and Amantadine before Rasagiline came on the market.  But as soon as it did, my doctor wanted me to add it to my regimen of drugs, which I did.  It is hard to say what each drug accomplishes for me, but I know that Pramipexole (Mirapex) is my chief symptom fighter.  It eliminated my handwriting problem, any tremors I had, my awkward gait, and more.  Whether Amantadine or Rasagiline or both may be responsible for delaying the disease's progress I do not know.  However, I have now had PD more than 20 years, and I am still in the first stage of development.  My doctors are not sure why, but we don't want to change anything in my treatment when I am lucky enough to be doing so well.

Exercise is important.  For many years of my PD, I exercised strenuously and often.  I am now 71 years old and have slacked off a lot without noticing any difference.  I read an article not long ago stating that exercise beyond 45 minutes does not do any more for the body.  My results make me believe it.  I used to work on weight machines and the elliptical more than I do now.  I have been practicing tai chi for five years and find it very helpful with flexibility and balance.  I also walk two to five miles per day five days a week over quite hilly trails and sidewalks.    If your mother is young and can do more, bicycling is reputedly excellent for many PD patients, too.  Or she could join a square dancing or line dancing class.

Your mother is fortunate to have you as her support and her researcher!  Good luck to both of you.

J

Great progress grey

You are fortunate to have had little side effects from pramipexole.

I never tried it but I did try ropinirole .Didn't work as well as sinemet so I dropped it.Your so right about exercise helping.Long walks are great.

Hope your doing well

john

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BobbieH and johnny --

First, my apologies for replying so late.  I have not been checking the forum lately.  For a few years I was active on three forums and found that they were gradually consuming all my free time.  Therefore, I have cut back on my online time considerably. 

BobbieH:  Yes, I am still taking that hideously long list of medications!  When I see them written out, I realize how many chemicals I'm putting in my body.  But they do work for me. Once a few years ago an acquaintance learned that I have PD.  She asked how I was keeping it under such control.  When I told her that I take pills at four times during the day, she looked absolutely horrified.  "You mean you'll have to take pills every day for life?"  I had to laugh.  And I told her that given the choice of swallowing pills or losing my ability to walk, I had never found it a difficult decision.  Then there are those people who say, "But you don't have a tremor.  Are you sure you have PD?"  If we remain patient, I suppose, we can spread a little education out there.

John:  I know I am very fortunate in being able to tolerate these strong medications.  For several years I was taking 6 mg. per day of Pramipexole (Mirapex)!  My current doctor asked me to reduce that to 4.5 mg., which I did, adding a small dose of Sinemet.  The only med that gives me a noticeable side effect is Sinemet:  I have begun to have a mild form of dyskinesis, swaying my body from the hips.  If I notice it, I can stop it by concentration, but often I'm swaying without even knowing it.

My very slowly progressing case of PD is a piece of good fortune.  I had my first symptoms approximately 21 years ago and am now 71 years old.  When I was participating in a research program last year, a very young doctor examined me before and after the physical tasks I performed for the study.  He said, "It's amazing!  You've had this so long without marked symptoms.  You probably won't . . . um . . . I mean you aren't going to . . . you'll probably never . . ."  Finally I put him out of his misery and said, "Yes, I know what you're trying to say.  I won't live long enough to get to the most advanced stage."

J

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/23/2018 at 12:35 PM, J of Grey Cottage said:

BobbieH and johnny --

First, my apologies for replying so late.  I have not been checking the forum lately.  For a few years I was active on three forums and found that they were gradually consuming all my free time.  Therefore, I have cut back on my online time considerably. 

BobbieH:  Yes, I am still taking that hideously long list of medications!  When I see them written out, I realize how many chemicals I'm putting in my body.  But they do work for me. Once a few years ago an acquaintance learned that I have PD.  She asked how I was keeping it under such control.  When I told her that I take pills at four times during the day, she looked absolutely horrified.  "You mean you'll have to take pills every day for life?"  I had to laugh.  And I told her that given the choice of swallowing pills or losing my ability to walk, I had never found it a difficult decision.  Then there are those people who say, "But you don't have a tremor.  Are you sure you have PD?"  If we remain patient, I suppose, we can spread a little education out there.

John:  I know I am very fortunate in being able to tolerate these strong medications.  For several years I was taking 6 mg. per day of Pramipexole (Mirapex)!  My current doctor asked me to reduce that to 4.5 mg., which I did, adding a small dose of Sinemet.  The only med that gives me a noticeable side effect is Sinemet:  I have begun to have a mild form of dyskinesis, swaying my body from the hips.  If I notice it, I can stop it by concentration, but often I'm swaying without even knowing it.

My very slowly progressing case of PD is a piece of good fortune.  I had my first symptoms approximately 21 years ago and am now 71 years old.  When I was participating in a research program last year, a very young doctor examined me before and after the physical tasks I performed for the study.  He said, "It's amazing!  You've had this so long without marked symptoms.  You probably won't . . . um . . . I mean you aren't going to . . . you'll probably never . . ."  Finally I put him out of his misery and said, "Yes, I know what you're trying to say.  I won't live long enough to get to the most advanced stage."

J

Good morning J.

Thank you for answering my message. Your letters have been very helpful.

Note: I've changed my picture and shorten my name from BobbieH to Bobbie_ .

I've been on Azilect 1mg alone for almost 3 months. Still have poor handwriting, the hand shakiness, weakness, and sometimes awkward gate and balance. Exercise helps. I'm working on adding Mirapex. Acupuncture (from head down to the toes) has very much helped calm down things. I always feel better afterwards. I try to go once a week.

My question is, if Mirapex was your chief symptom fighter, why did you need to take the others (Levodopa, Amantadine)? Also, what is your daily dose of CoQ10?

thank you

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, Bobbie --

I love your new photo!  I should change mine one of these days.  It was taken three years ago.

Azilect doesn't do anything noticeable for me either.  However, my doctors seem to have faith in its ability to slow the progress of PD, and my progress has certainly been slow.  Therefore, I keep taking it.  Maybe my case would be slow even without it, but I don't care to find out the hard way that Azilect was really having its desired effect.  The same holds true for CoQ10.  It may be doing nothing, but I continue to take 200 mg. per day.  (I use Jarrow Formulas' Ubiquinol.)

When I first started taking Mirapex, only a small dose eliminated my symptoms.  But as time passed, I needed more and graduated to larger daily doses.  Eventually, Parkinson's seems to overcome our efforts to fight it.  As I mentioned, I was on 6 mg. per day for a long time, a maximal dosage.  But when my symptoms emerged again, my doctor wanted to add a different medication; hence, the carb/levo.  Amantadine I have taken almost from the start; I have no idea if it is doing anything at all.  My current doctor cut my dosage in half, and I noticed no changes.

Best of luck,

J

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/23/2018 at 7:35 PM, J of Grey Cottage said:

, I am still taking that hideously long list of medications!  When I see them written out, I realize how many chemicals I'm putting in my body.  But they do work for me. Once a few years ago an acquaintance learned that I have PD.  She asked how I was keeping it under such control.  When I told her that I take pills at four times during the day, she looked absolutely horrified.  "You mean you'll have to take pills every day for life?"  I had to laugh.  And I told her that given the choice of swallowing pills or losing my ability to walk, I had never found it a difficult decision.  Then there are those people who say, "But you don't have a tremor.  Are you sure you have PD?"  If we remain patient, I suppose, we can spread a little education out there.

 

This is very painful subject. Many people just don't want to know.

If u r healthy it is such a fun to be your friend, there r so many things we can do togeather! But u r ill and it spoils everything. Actually you are spoiling everything! 

One of my friends used to tell me about some people which are very ill and still are so positive! This you people do a lot of things :going out late, travelling,.hiking. ‏if they do it why you can't? Look at Yourself You don't Look ill. Yiu need to be positive and everything Will Be OK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Hi, Natasha Kogan --

You are right:  this can be a painful subject.  Other people may tell us how to feel or what to do.  But I believe the patient, the one with the disease, knows best what is happening.  Optimism can help us; so can activity.   But they are not cures.  People have told me, too, that I look healthy and therefore I am healthy.  Since I am lucky enough to have a slow-moving case of PD, I realize that it is easier for me than for some others to maintain a very positive attitude.  Although I encourage others to be as happy as they can in their circumstances, I hope I never sound as if I am telling them how they should feel or that I really don't believe they are ill.  We all do the best we can, but if we have PD, we are ill to some degree, no matter how we look.

J

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I get up that usally does 90% of getting going and saying good buy to PD blues.Its my 9th year about same dose c/l.The only thing that bothers me is the pesky jerks.What a conversation starter.lol

.One big thing I do is visited those in homes and try and encourage.personally I feel no one with PD should need one Number one cause is over medicated and lack of good information.if they play their cards wellI think some doctors frighten patients into moving into NH far to often.There is no way I would ever consider them.

PD is advancing but my will is steading the course.lol

Laughter therapy a great help.

haha,hehe hohoho

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×