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maral77

Husband keeps falling need suggestions

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Ok DH is in a Nursing home as I have posted. His PD is progressing, and is having many falls. Out of bed at night and also tries to stand up from his chair and falls. Beside myself as with Fed and State Laws passed they are not allowed to use mats on the floor, longer rails across the bed, no alarm that would go off when trying to get up or out of bed. They put swim noodle on edge of his mattress and being a big guy he rolled right over them and onto the floor. Now for the chair they put what is like a brake on the back of his chair so if he stands up the chair will not roll away from him but lifts slightly backwards which in turn suppose to make him fall back into the chair.  SO has anyone had a loved one where you have had these problems or know of someone. Trying to figure out something where his falls will be less. Any info anyone has would be helpful.

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Mara, this is such a perplexing situation.  I didn't know of all of these laws.  

You might try contacting the nursing area of some progressive care communities to ask what they do.  The contacts for the director of the assisted living and nursing area here in the retirement community where I live is Heather Uttenreither@erickson.com; 410-657-3599.  You might try asking what sorts of things they have found helpful for your husband's situation.

Also, you might try contacting "A Place for Mom" on line and ask them if they can help you.

Perhaps contacting a medical supply company might be a good idea, too. 

I know this must be a frustrating situation, and I'll stop and pray now to ask the Lord to guide you as you search for some help.

Linda

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22 hours ago, Linda Garren said:

Mara, this is such a perplexing situation.  I didn't know of all of these laws.  

You might try contacting the nursing area of some progressive care communities to ask what they do.  The contacts for the director of the assisted living and nursing area here in the retirement community where I live is Heather Uttenreither@erickson.com; 410-657-3599.  You might try asking what sorts of things they have found helpful for your husband's situation.

Also, you might try contacting "A Place for Mom" on line and ask them if they can help you.

Perhaps contacting a medical supply company might be a good idea, too. 

I know this must be a frustrating situation, and I'll stop and pray now to ask the Lord to guide you as you search for some help.

Linda

Thanks Linda guess everyone else has been lucky and have never had this problem. I did find out that with his doctors prescription to have a half rail put on his bed the Nursing home has to do so. I understand and everyone I talked to and called and asked said the long rails are not allowed. He goes on the 2nd to see his neurologist so will go from there.

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The real problem is that we have too many pinheads in the government that have nothing better to do than sit around and make stupid laws.  These idiot politicians should all be thrown in jail, but I'm sure there is a law against that too.  LOL!

On a more serious note, my mother in law died after a fall at the hospital.  They knew she was a fall risk, but the stupid laws prevented them from doing anything significant to prevent her fall.  Short of someone staying with your DH 24/7/365, it is nearly impossible to prevent a fall.  I'm sure that your DH has already had rehab to lessen the likelihood of a fall.

 

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Oh yes he had 21 days of Rehab then thanks for our insurance and Medicare no longer, but also found out now that with his doctors prescription that it is crucial he starts it once again, that it will. He has to have a "Speech/Swallow therapist" so when we go will request the full. 

 

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Sorry Maral but in a NH he is not getting one on one attention like he was at home with you so unless you wrap him in bubble wrap there is nothing much that they will do for him.   It is a very scary thing of course.  My co-worker's grand mother was in a home.  She  fell out of bed and had a concussion and eventually passed away as a result.   I thought of getting bed rails for my mom's bed but saw a very scary picture of someone's head getting wedged in between them so that was out of the question.  There are always pros and cons for everything.   Please keep us posted.

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When my husband was in rehab, because he was a fall risk, they used what is called a high-low bed that can be lowered right to the floor to prevent injury if he should roll out of bed.  An honest fact is that though precautions can be taken, falls are hard to totally prevent without someone in attendance 24 hours a day and even then there are falls. The reason for no long bars on the bed is that they can cause greater injury.  It is easy to blame the NH and regulations, but they do the best they can.  Before my DH was totally bedridden, he would fall right before my eyes when I was within an arms reach and in our home under my 24 hour care.  One of the aides who comes on hospice told me one of her patients fell and shattered her hip last week.  Her son had taken her into the bathroom to help her shower.  He had her hold onto the bar while he turned to get her clothes and she went down.  I am so sorry about the falls.  Maybe it is better to risk falls than to physically restrain someone by tying them in a chair or bed all the time.  That is what they used to do before regulations against it.

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Genden - What's wrong with physically restraining someone?  There are seat belts on wheelchairs  and car seats that prevent people from falling over or out so why not a chair or bed?   They don't have to be tight where it cuts off circulations.   When I have my mom in the wheelchair and walk her around the park she likes to take her legs off the feet stand so I use a pair of socks and tie her ankles to them and off we go without any problems.  Would I be cited for that? 

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No, you would not be cited for that.  When they take patients for walks in a wheelchair, they can strap them in.  That makes sense.  It used to be because it was easier and took less staff that patients were put in a chair, strapped in and then left for the day.  Then at night tied in for the night.  It was for the convenience of the facility, but torture for the patients. Your comment about bubble wrap was an appropriate observation.  It is nearly impossible to avoid risks and still treat patients humanely and with dignity.  We all die, there is no escaping that fact,  but if we make life so miserable to avoid risks that life is not worth living, that is not a good solution either.

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Oh I see.  Yes it's convenient for the workers but restrictive for the patients. It's also still a matter of being short handed.   There are way too many patients per worker to look after.   Even if someone is right in front of you they can still get hurt.   Did I miss something or why can't they put soft mats on the ground by the beds so when they fall at least they land protected?  My mom sleeps on her side and only faces the right side of her queen size bed so she sleeps on the left side with plenty of space for her to inch over until she's comfy and then she sleeps. A few times her legs will come off the bed from her sleeping in a diagonal position so I have to keep watch to scoot her back in before she falls out eventually.   When patients are in the later stage of the disease it really is very hard to keep them safe at all times. 

 

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Soft mats are also illegal. I am very aware that I cannot put him in a bubble wrap, I was merely reaching out for maybe something that the NH and myself have overlooked. Apparently not, so he will keep falling and one day I will get the call that he is dead from brain injury or bleeding to death. The falling is due to PD, have talked to many family members who I have met while DH has been in the NH whose loved ones are or were in because of PD. Four of them for fact. Three are no longer with and all three died from falls, the one remaining falls alot also. Not saying everyone with stage 5 will die this way, but odds are no matter how much exercise whatever will fall. Thanks everyone and I will leave this post. Aware of all the laws, reasons for why safety measures can no longer be in NH so will just pray, keep going in every day and as I did with my dear son who just passed away Aug 4th, I knew he would not outlive me, so therefore I know DH will die as everyone has to but am sure it will be from a fall. As all his vitals and tests otherwise as the nurses and doctors say has vitals and blood work of a 20 year old.

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Maral77, I wish you and your husband the best and hope you were not offended by my comments. My DH has been diagnosed for 20+ years, has severe dementia and has been bed bound and on hospice for eight months.  I care for him at home.  The daily battle with the help of CNA's and nurses is to prevent and treat pressure sores.  He has a deep bedsore on his tailbone that we are keeping from spreading and getting infected. It means constant turning and vigilance.  A nurse changes his dressing daily. Today we are dealing with bowel issues.  Feeding him has become a challenge.  He has no co-morbid conditions and his vital statistics are very good.  He is very thin.  He has no quality of life.  This may sound harsh, but with what he is suffering, if he had passed away quickly from a fall, in my opinion, it would have been a blessing.  As the nurse left a few minutes ago, she said it breaks my heart. There are things worse than death.

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Same here.   I meant no disrespect Maral.  We are all being frank and honest with our suggestions and perceptions of how these situations are handled.  Yes indeed there are worse things than death.  It's the road getting there that sucks.  My uncle had a sudden heart attack a year ago.  He died in the ambulance on the way to the hospital.  It was short and quick and his family never had to deal with what we are going through now as CG's.   Only people in our shoes will know what I'm talking about.  Death to me is the only way this can  finally end.  No more worries, planning, and second guessing.    

 

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