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Superdecooper

Question about Link between dopamine and testosterone

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Hi Mark,

I posted this in Ask the Doctor too, but I wanted to get the opinion of a pharmacist..

i read somewhere that many men with PD have low testosterone. 

 After a brain MRI, My endocrinologist told me several years ago - long before I took note of my current  tremors and other related PD symptoms - that my pituitary gland had stopped signaling for production of testosterone. Now I'm wondering about the link between low T and PD.

I found this in a recent posting at https://neuroendoimmune.wordpress.com/2013/11/13/dopamine-and-testosterone-two-important-pieces-of-the-neuroendocrine-puzzle/p

"An up-regulation of dopamine stimulates the release of prolactin inhibitory factor (PIF). PIF inhibits the pituitary from releasing prolactin. Because prolactin inhibits gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion, the inhibition of prolactin caused by dopamine, increases the secretion of GnRH, therefore increasing the secretion of testosterone."

In light of the above information, I'm wondering if taking Azilect, which my MDS has prescribed, might lead to an increase in my production of testosterone? If so, I might try to decrease my daily replacement testosterone supplement.

-S

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S,

Since Azilect is in a class of medications called MAO-B Inhibitors, they will boost the effectiveness of the Dopamine we already produce. It will not create more Dopamine. 

It is my medical mind that says it  appears that it is the volume, not the effectiveness,  of dopamine that will affect prolactin production. 

Eventually almost everyone who has PD will be on Levodopa therapy, which can coincide with Azilect therapy. At that point more Levodopa will cause an increase in Dopamine. 

What we also have to look at is the total amount of Dopamine we have at any particular moment. We do not see symptoms until about 80% of the Dopamine cells are dead or non functional. What we need to find out is at what % Dopamine Cells remaining affects the production of prolactin, and thusly, Testosterone. At this point I have not seen any in for to tell us that.

I hope this helps and please keep me posted. 

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Hi Mark,

I'm trying to take a best estimate of when my PD symptoms might have started. I began having low T issues in my early 40s, but that went undiagnosed until my late 40s. I was just wondering whether a dopamine deficiency in my early 40s could have kicked off testosterone problems, since the endocrinologist did a brain MRI but could find no physical and no underlying disease for the lack of testosterone production. 

-S 

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Super,

That could very well be the issue. It is very hard to tell when the dead Dopamine cells reached the magic number of about 80%. The closer you get to that number the more prevalent the symptoms become.

In my case, for example, I was diagnosed at the age of 29. Thinking back to the time before the diagnosis I can remember instances of symptoms occurring, though they were very minimal at the time. Now I can usually see someone who has PD just by how they walk.

I hope this helps and please keep me. 

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