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Parkinsons and sugar intake

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Is there any evidence that high sugar intake is  linked to increased motor symptoms? I eat a lot of sugar (really - lots!) and while my weight is good and I am super active, I still wonder if I just need to kick the sugar addiction...

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I'm interested in this too. Have you tried asking Dr. Okun? 

I walk 2 to 4 miles a day and swim at least 30 mins a day, but I feel like I'm eating too much sugary junk. 

-S

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I've been told that PD itself causes sugar cravings. I used to prefer salty snacks. I found myself choosing sweet snacks soon after diagnosis. My husband asked me one day in  2012 why I was using so much sugar in my tea. I hadn't even noticed.

Dianne 

 

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I have heard the same as Dianne,

Personally before my Diagnosis, if I wanted to stop my sugar cravings or even change my diet, all I had to do was set my mind to it and I would stop eating said item. Now I set my intent to stop and I keep finding my self grabbing a cookie here, candy bar there, sneaking some chocolate chips and so on. I can not seem to control my need for sweets as well as I used to.

One explanation I read was because we lack dopamine (the feel good chemical) our bodies or minds tend to replace it with the sugar high that gives us a sense of feeling good.

Made sense to me.

Going to ask my MDS if there is any studies on this.

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Here's an article on sugar and alzheimers:  link.   I can't believe sugar is anything but bad for PD, my own weakness for sugar not withstanding.  I've found that substitution makes it easier to forgo sugar.  Lately, I eat Lara bars - they are delicious and their sweetness comes from dates!

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On 2/1/2018 at 8:10 AM, Superdecooper said:

Any chance sugar craving could be tied to taking dopamine agonist drugs. 

Yes.

I have come to realize there is a sugar intake relationship with my symptoms!

I seem to have worse issues over Thanksgiving and Christmas. Cold weather, extra stress, and sugar all play a role.

I was doing pretty well a few weeks after Christmas. Still cold, less Holiday Stress. Life is good.

Girl Scout Cookies! Oh, I love those things, darn if my movements/fatigue didn't get worse!

It is important to keep a journal of symptoms, depression, pain, yadda. Record medication times, when you ate, sweets, cups of coffee, how much sleep you got. Do all this on a daily basis.Every two to three months, go back and chart the daily "today was a good day" "today was a bad day". No coffee after 10 AM for me! Reduce stress when possible. I didn't expect it, but days when I walked 12,000 steps (over six miles) occurred with no sugar the previous week. Sugar intake goes up, fewer steps more fatigue.  RA issues seem to be worse with sugar intake. Can not find any correlation between neuropathy pain and anything else.

The Peripheral Neuropathy is an odd one, as I am not diabetic. It seems common for those on Chemo, but no chemo to treat my cancer (not an option -- grows to slow for Chemo to touch it, so radiate and surgery are my options). I had severe dermatitis on hands/feet as a child, so maybe some other auto-immune issue at play.  Pustular Psoriasis is the medical term, but at the time was called severe eczema. It was controlled by cortisone topical and injections (from age 5 to 20, cleared up as I got older, but small patches still appear on occasion).

So keep a daily chart, and do a summary every three months to give a one-page overview for MDS.   I'll type it up a few days early so I can review and edit. I'll leave it out with keys and wallet, so I don't forget it. My wife will put a line through a few comments "doing fine, good balance" with "fell twice this week". She doesn't attend my doctor appointments but this gives my MDS additional feedback.

Jul -- my snack is Dates and Almonds. A Good healthy one!

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Tom,

good suggestions.

i keep a journal, but I have to consider doing it in a more regular basis. Right now it's every other day or so. I don't want to face what I'm going through, much less, keep a record of it. But I might start after a while.

i never thought sugar and fatigue would be related. I thought I ate more when I needed more energy to do stuff.maybe it could be holding me back from doing more stuff. 

I get between 5000 and 10000 steps per day. I'd like it to be more consistent. 

-S

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Tex, I just last night was reading about the benefits of dates!  There are so many!!  But the suggested recommended amount per day is one date because that will do it, and because dates have so many calories.  I've enjoyed dates with pecans as a snack.  And I could eat a whole container of raw almonds, but in reading about how caloric they are (which surprised me), I have had to cut back.  Darn.  :-)  I got some carrots a cucumber, fresh dill, and apples and some awesome organic whole milk yogurt that  is the best I've ever found.  Those are all nice treats as snacks during the day.

Just FYI for the group, my MDS started me on 2mg copper each day.  He said it is important for Parkies.  I find it has made a huge difference in my problems with fatigue.  I feel so much better on it.  He had me get a baseline copper serum blood test prior to my starting to take the copper, and it was low.   He stressed how important it is to have a good level of copper (but not too much, as that is detrimental) to help with the body/brain connections to help improve some of our symptoms.  It's important to keep potassium and zinc and iron at levels that don't interfere with the copper.

Edited by Linda Garren

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