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John Hoefen

PD is not the end

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Good Morning

Happen to be reading the obits today.There was a women born 1921 who had PD the last 20 years.She lived her llife with a strong will .She also survived cancer twice

There is no better friend than a strong will.

Listen to your heart and don't let articles and poor doctors scare you.My conndition has improved by adapting to it.My doctor now is me.

Havea nice day.

Best

John Hoefen 

Edited by John Hoefen
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15 hours ago, John Hoefen said:

Good Morning

Happen to be reading the obits today.There was a women born 1921 who had PD the last 20 years.She lived her llife with a strong will .She also survived cancer twice

There is no better friend than a strong will.

Listen to your heart and don't let articles and poor doctors scare you.My conndition has improved by adapting to it.My doctor now is me.

Havea nice day.

Best

John Hoefen 

Amen. 

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15 hours ago, John Hoefen said:

Listen to your heart and don't let articles and poor doctors scare you.My condition has improved by adapting to it.My doctor now is me.

Well said, John.

 

 

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My husband is in a group for exercising.  As the Physical therapist says No Two people have the same like symptoms.  It is so true as you see the different issues with each person.  People have a tendency to lump everyone in a big category.  Great advice!!

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My husband's MDS says if you've seen one person with Parkinson's, you've seen one person with Parkinson's. 

 

 

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It's been rough sledding lately. It's good to find positive motivation here. Strong willpower tends to ebb and flow with me. Being able to write this......at this very moment is cathartic.

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Rough sledding is a good description right now. My husband had been pretty stable on "little gun" medicines for 13 years. They weren't cutting it and so he's giving up Artane and trying Rytary. Not working out so well, could not keep up in his exercise classes today. Need to give it longer but it is hard. I'm going to use the rough sledding description, we will get to the smooth glide at the bottom of the hill! 

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As with so many others, I've been going through a rough patch. It helps to know there are others here who understand. 

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HI Linda,

Thanks for the post.

"The people who are the most comforting and the most encouraging are those who have endured hardships and have been made smooth because of those challenges."

The gist seems to be that life's troubles, such as Parkinson's, will make you graceful and smooth like a stone, worn by time and ocean currents. I've heard that before. I'll let you know how it works out after I get out of this riptide and come up for air.

-S

Edited by Superdecooper
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15 hours ago, Superdecooper said:

HI Linda,

Thanks for the post.

"The people who are the most comforting and the most encouraging are those who have endured hardships and have been made smooth because of those challenges."

The gist seems to be that life's troubles, such as Parkinson's, will make you graceful and smooth like a stone, worn by time and ocean currents. I've heard that before. I'll let you know how it works out after I get out of this riptide and come up for air.

-S

Don't know about that. I've had an easy, wonderful life. So fantastic that, when I got Parkinson's at 58, I said..."okay, that's a fair trade for having 58 wonderful years beforehand".

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22 minutes ago, MusicMan said:

Don't know about that. I've had an easy, wonderful life. So fantastic that, when I got Parkinson's at 58, I said..."okay, that's a fair trade for having 58 wonderful years beforehand".

 Great advice I got was “No one has perfect health.  So stop expecting it.”  Of course, adages or sayings are easier said than lived, but it was a good point.  We just know averages at this point and the average person is “healthy.”  

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4 hours ago, MusicMan said:

Don't know about that. I've had an easy, wonderful life. So fantastic that, when I got Parkinson's at 58, I said..."okay, that's a fair trade for having 58 wonderful years beforehand".

Agree with your sentiment.  I have had a great life (not easy) filled with many blessings. Got my diagnosis at 61 but with slow progression I am still capable of doing many things.  Just got back from a trip to help my brother out who has lymphoma.  Who could have predicted our senior outcomes so to speak? 

I do the rock steady boxing program a few times a week and hit the elliptical trainer regularly.  This past week I joined my 33 year old son in Memphis, TN  at a predawn bootcamp style work out with 25 other relatively young guys--  45 minutes of burpees, sit-ups, pushups, jumping jacks, windmills, and running.  I hit several physical "walls" but finished the course in a pool of sweat.  Doing that at sunrise with my son--priceless!  Having no one suspect I had Parkinsons but was just a senior participant?  That was exhilarating just to be one of the guys @ 64. yrs old.   I have to keep challenging myself.  Thankful each day, nothing taken for granted!

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Last night i wanted to go fishing.many of my fishing friends have given up the sport.old age loll

Well i went alone and caught three nice big salmon

Moral of the story  true fishermen never grow old including Parkies

Lol

Have a nice

John

Ps if ypu live near me  i have lots of good salmon

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Hello John Hoefen, I had , no have a fly rod.  They are really hard to tie now, flies that is.  That is great that you still go fishing.  Ha, I jumped at fly fishing but you probably catch salmon trolling the Pacific Northwest.  Maybe even up into Britsh Columbia. Yes, I agree with Cereus.  fresh salmon would be great.

wecome aboard John H,

 

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On 8/11/2018 at 2:00 AM, Dancing Bear said:

Agree with your sentiment.  I have had a great life (not easy) filled with many blessings. Got my diagnosis at 61 but with slow progression I am still capable of doing many things.  Just got back from a trip to help my brother out who has lymphoma.  Who could have predicted our senior outcomes so to speak? 

I do the rock steady boxing program a few times a week and hit the elliptical trainer regularly.  This past week I joined my 33 year old son in Memphis, TN  at a predawn bootcamp style work out with 25 other relatively young guys--  45 minutes of burpees, sit-ups, pushups, jumping jacks, windmills, and running.  I hit several physical "walls" but finished the course in a pool of sweat.  Doing that at sunrise with my son--priceless!  Having no one suspect I had Parkinsons but was just a senior participant?  That was exhilarating just to be one of the guys @ 64. yrs old.   I have to keep challenging myself.  Thankful each day, nothing taken for granted!

Enjoyed reading your post, DB.  Always nice to get time to be with family.

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