Jump to content
helplinedonate
  • Announcements

    • ForumAdmin

      Frequently Asked Questions - Step by step guides

      Do you need assistance registering, logging in, posting, etc? Please visit the all new Frequently Asked Question Forum for step-by-step guides. Click the link below to access these helpful guides. Frequently Asked Questions
    • ForumAdmin

      Recursos Nuevos en Español

      http://www.parkinson.org/ayuda   http://www.parkinson.org/espanol    
    • ForumAdmin

      Línea de Ayuda 1-800-473-4636

      Línea de Ayuda 1-800-473-4636   ¿Qué es la línea de ayuda 1-800-4PD-INFO (473-4636) de la Fundación Nacional de Parkinson? Es un número de teléfono gratuito que ayuda a las personas con la enfermedad de Parkinson, sus familiares, amigos y profesionales de salud, a solucionar diferentes inquietudes.   La línea de ayuda ofrece: Información actualizada Apoyo emocional Referidos a profesionales de salud Recursos comunitarios Amplia variedad de publicaciones gratis    
Dr. Okun

New Study: Could getting rid of iron help PD

Recommended Posts

Dear forum members,

 

The metal iron seems to accumulate in the PD brain. There has been some interest as to whether treatments focused at getting rid of iron might help PD symptoms. It is unknown at this time. Below is a recent review article that just came out on the topic.

 

Curr Bioact Compd. 2008 Oct 1;4(3):150-158. Links

Iron Chelators as Potential Therapeutic Agents for Parkinson's Disease.

 

Perez CA, Tong Y, Guo M.

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, MA 02747-2300.

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurological disorder characterized by the progressive impairment of motor skills in patients. Growing evidence suggests that abnormal redox-active metal accumulation, caused by dysregulation, plays a central role in the neuropathology of PD. Redox-active metals (e.g. Fe and Cu) catalyze essential reactions for brain function. However, these metals can also participate in the generation of highly toxic free radicals that can cause oxidative damage to cells and ultimately lead to the death of dopamine-containing neurons. The emergence of redox-active metals as key players in the pathogenesis of PD strongly suggests that metal-chelators could be beneficial in the treatment of this condition. This mini-review summarizes major recent developments on natural, synthetic iron chelating compounds and hydrogen peroxide-triggered prochelators as potential candidates for PD treatment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the comment. I hope not. For those who don't know he has an iron overload disease often treated by frequent blood draws!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Interesting article...I'm wondering if consuming drinking water high in iron (rust turbidity) would pose a high risk of concentrated iron in the brain. Any thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting.

 

I doubt that enough iron could be absorbed and then manage to get past the brains protective barrier (the blood brain barrier).

 

There is some interest in testing iron chelators for PD (they remove iron) but these chelation drugs can be very dangerous and if a trial occurs it will have to have maximal safety for patients.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

There is some interest in testing iron chelators for PD (they remove iron) but these chelation drugs can be very dangerous and if a trial occurs it will have to have maximal safety for patients.

 

Would it not be far safer to remove the iron by venesection ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By venesection I am guessing you mean by frequent blood draws such as is performed for diseases of high iron (hemochromatosis). The issue is whether this would affect iron in the brain which is protected by the blood brain barrier. It is unknown at this time. We do not recommend bloodletting (venesection) or iron chelation at this time, however it is a very interesting discussion.

 

Thanks for the comment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

I remember reading that too little iron can be as problematic for PDers and everybody else. I reviewed the most common symptoms of iron toxicity and deficiency. I discovered that I experienced more of the deficiency symptoms than the toxicity symptoms. So I began to take a multi-vitamin with iron rather than one without it.

 

This provided 100% of the RDA, no more. So I felt it was probably safe. I wasn't adding megadoses of iron to my diet, just the 100% RDA.

 

About a year later now, I do feel a little bit better, certainly not worse, and no side effects at all. I recently had a blood test that showed that even with the supplement I was still at the very low end of the "normal" range.

 

By the way, I am 53 yrs old and have had PD for over 20 yrs now.

 

Any thoughts on this would be appreciated.

KK

 

[/u]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great point,

 

Too low of iron can lead to anemia, fatigue, and also restless legs among other things.

 

A multi-vitamin is a good idea!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×